writing, writing tips

Writing Tip: How to Take Writing Advice

feedback smiley scale

Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. – Neil Gaiman

 

Oh Neil, you’re so correct. The above advice “works for me” and I take it.

So should you, dear blog reader.

Everyone is a Writer (even when they aren’t)

I’ve written numerous times about the benefits of writer’s groups. I firmly believe you should find one local to you and join it if possible.

With that out of the way, there are still some important guidelines when it comes to accepting advice from either a critique group, beta reader, or even (I’m going there) an EDITOR.

One of the things that makes writing difficult is showing it to others. Once the cat is out of the bag, you’re going to get all kinds of feedback. Some of it will improve your story, and some of it needs to be ignored.

Advice to Take

  • Rule of 3: I adhere to the “Rule of 3” – If three people independently tell me something isn’t working for them or they didn’t like part of a story, then I’ll look at it and try to improve or fix it. It is obvious that something is amiss for that many people to notice. Better 3 than 3000.
  • When Something is “Off” – Like my man Neil G. said up top. When readers have an inexplicable feeling that something doesn’t work, then you need to review that part of your story. Good writing evokes emotion, and if readers are getting all the wrong feels, then that is a red flag.
  • (Most) Advice from Your Editor – HAH! LOOK I BACK TRACKED! But seriously, if you are working with a professional editor, put your ego aside and respect their objective skill set. If they are questioning something that is absolutely, 100% non-negotiable to your story, then you should at least have a detailed discussion with them to try and figure out whether other edits can make that thing you’re holding onto work better in the greater context. I mean, sometimes even editors can be wrong…sometimes.
  • “Tough Love” from your Inner Circle – Most authors develop relationships over time with a few people they REALLY trust. Writer’s groups, editors, beta readers, etc. If one of your most trusted people who has a solid, previous track record of quality feedback says something like “this just isn’t up to your normal standard” or something similar, then you should listen. It might hurt, but it’s very likely they have your best interest in mind.

Advice to Ignore

  • “Here’s What you SHOULD WRITE” – It’s not their story. Don’t change your words into the ones they wrote for you. NEXT!
  • “That’s Just My Opinion” – If 10 people love it, and 1 person says it is total trash, you’re probably safe to ignore it. Especially if there is no underlying reason and they just “didn’t like it”.
  • Twitter – Don’t take generalized writing advice from social media. (But DO take expert long-form writing advice from random authors who you stumble across on blog sites like WordPress!)
  • Angry People – This is a very situational one, but I’ve had it happen. If someone blasts you, and just tears your work apart, sometimes it’s them and not you. If you have a personal connection and know they are going through a difficult time or are just not in the correct head space to read critically, then sometimes you should either ignore the advice or ask them to read it again at a later date if you’re comfortable doing so.

In Conclusion

I hope this post can help you navigate the difficult situations that can arise when you’re taking feedback on your work. I have a feeling it might, but I’m not going to tell you which tips to specifically use.

writing tips

More Reasons to Join A Writer’s Group

advice-advise-advisor-7096

Summer is right around the corner, and that’s going to mark the second anniverary of my writer’s group. We’ve had numerous up’s and down’s, membership turnover, and even a venue change, but the core group of authors who initially put it all together are still there, grinding away and putting out the work.

In honor of this, I want to re-visit my earlier ‘Reasons to Join A Writer’s Group’ post with a few more ideas now that our family has grown and matured (or at least gotten older).

Networking

The writer’s group I belong to is successful. That might sound a bit conceited, but it’s true. In the past two years, nearly every author in the group is traditionally published, gotten into a respected Workshop, worked with well-known editors on anthologies, or raised their platform through media tours. One of our members even got a multi-book deal.

Now, all of that is on their own hard work and diligence, but having a trusted group of friends and colleagues to advise and share contacts with is also so much more important than I ever would have known. Being able to “vouch” for another writer to an editor, agent, or artist can open doors you simply wouldn’t have come across flying solo. Plus, we learn from one another’s triumphs and failures, which better helps everyone in the group to navigate the complex landscape of writing and publishing.

Trusted Critiques

Writing is an extremely personal thing, and as one member of my group put it “it takes a lot of trust to hand your work over to someone”. This is true, and what has struck me even more, years on, is that critiques in our group have become simultaneously more comfortable and more intense. As you get to know one another, walls come down, and you can both give and receive the kind of fundamental, honest feedback that is needed to improve a book or story. Plus, when you receive that constructive criticism, you know it’s coming from a place of honest encouragement. We all have each other’s best interest in mind.

Accountability

Meeting with a group regularly, over the long-term, helps to keep you accountable to actually write. Knowing you need to submit, at least every once in a while, will keep you from getting too comfortable. You want to write, after all, and it helps to have friends with common goals who will really push you to get words on the page.

Are you a member of a local writer’s group in your area? If so, tell me about your experiences down in the comments.