photography

Reviewing Flickr One Year Later

flickr logo

When it comes to putting your photographs on the internet, the options are overwhelming.

Instagram, Facebook, Amazon Photos, Google Photos, Flickr, 500px, and many others are all competing for your your images.

When I got back into film photography, I wanted to find a place to present my best images, and also have the option to link them here.

Right around the same time, Flickr was purchased from Yahoo by a company called SmugMug, and they began a long and painful restoration of the service from years of neglect by the previous owner.

Since I don’t use Facebook and didn’t use Instagram (at the time), I thought Flickr would be a nice option given that it doesn’t compress uploads and I wanted all the grainy goodness from those negative scans.

That was in late 2018, and there have been a number of changes and updates to Flickr since then. Some for better, some worse.

Positives

  • High-Res Photos: Whether you’re free with a 1000 photo limit, or pay for their “Pro” accounts, Flickr let’s you upload full resolution photos, no compression, and within a few parameters view them in up to 6K. Being able to push photos up to the internet without the cropping and compression of most social media sites is really nice if you want to show off images in their full glory.
  • Prints-On-Demand: Flickr also has functionality to purchase prints within the site/app and that is a good feature if you’d like high-quality physical copies of your full res uploads.
  • Groups: Flickr has an extremely knowledgeable photo community that is very focused. With Instagram having transformed into a marketing/Influencer playground, it’s nice to see groups, Events, and a community solely dedicated to the craft of photography.
  • No more Yahoo login : Thankfully, you no longer need a Yahoo email to log into Flickr, and they updated their mobile app as well. It has a nice, clean and easy-to-navigate interface.

Negatives

  • Limits on Free Accounts: I questioned whether to list this. I will, only because so many people complained about the 1000 photo limit after SmugMug bought the site. Yahoo had let Flickr decompose into a photo-hosting dump over the years. It was basically a crappier Imgur. The new Flickr has a narrower focus, and it imposes limitations unless you pay for an account. That said, if you’re a photographer who wants unlimited online storage of uncompressed photos, it’s not a bad deal. Or if you’re a hobbyist like me, 1000 photos and a few occasional ads isn’t really horrible, especially considering they let you keep the rights to your images and don’t share any of your personal data like the larger social sites do.
  • Site is “slow”: I do not mean technically. What I mean is, other than exploring photos, there isn’t much to “do” on Flickr. It doesn’t have the same level of interactivity as Instagram. To my point above, its very useful if you’re a photographer, but it doesn’t have the wider appeal of the major social media sites. One of the problems they seem to have is after combating all the image spammers Yahoo ignored, they have a bunch of abandoned groups. I think Flickr would do well to clean house and improve their community capabilities so the existing active users and newcomers can find one another more easily.
  • Long-Term Viability: I received an email from Flickr’s CEO that the site is still losing money. This doesn’t bode well at all for its long-term viability, and I hope that it survives. I think there is a lot of potential, and from what I understand a number of photographers are starting to move away from Instagram in its current incarnation. Hopefully Flickr and other dedicated photo sites can catch that population.

Conclusion

If you’re interested in photography as a hobby/craft (or a business) and are looking for a site as a quick portfolio, I think Flickr has made some huge strides in recovery and is worth at least checking out. Yahoo really let it languish, and my hope is that it manages to financially stabilize and eventually recover as the team there makes continued improvements. If you have an old account and haven’t logged in for a while, give it a look.

article

Blogs Are Still Relevant in 2019

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While putting in extra time to market the re-release of Detroit 2020, I have been giving a lot of thought to blogging. In particular, blogs versus social media.

While I forcibly had to upgrade to a smartphone from last year’s beloved flip phone, I still refuse to put any social media apps on it, because of all the creativity-stifling reasons outlined here.

I’ve reduced my usage to Twitter alone, via a desktop app. I feel it’s a better way to interact with the service.

But enough about that…

If you’re a writer, or anyone with a serious artistic hobby, I want to convince you that having a blog is still totally relevant in 2019. You might think blogs are falling by the wayside, but I believe they are still a powerful tool for relationship building.

Blogs Are Your Space

Blogs are a place for you to compose complex thoughts, and more nuanced posts on broad topics. They are also a place that you can display or discuss your creative work to an audience. That body of work comes together and creates a much stronger online identity and portfolio of work than the limited profile spaces that social media sites give you. Most of those social profiles give you a spot to place your URL. You should have a blog to put in there. This is especially true if you pay for your own blog hosting and can customize things extensively.

Blogs Promote Long-Form Content

Readers want long form content. Videos, memes, and 280-character posts are generally glorified fluff commentary. To really understand something and have an informed conversation that is more than just noise, you need “long reads”. Blogs are still the best place online for that. No imposed limitations and the ability to use different forms of media to create complex posts. That old saying “content is king” still applies.

Blogs Are Easy

People say things like “I don’t get Twitter.” or “I don’t get Instagram.” Social media platforms all have different little quirks and systems that they use to stand out. Those quirks create a learning curve, and sometimes rules of etiquette. Blogs are so much easier. You just click, read, and then comment if you are inclined. There’s no hashtags or icons or flags to figure out why (and if) you should be pushing them.

Blogs Build Real Audiences

Blogs build relationships. They create “real readership” and and an engaged audience. Most social media entails “liking” a post, and maybe a quick comment or two. It’s essentially saying “Hey, we both enjoy this same thing. Cool.” and not much happens after that. Bloggers can guest post, link to one-another, and re-use or share content in a number of ways with other like-minded people. Plus, similar to email lists, readers/followers are generally much more committed than on social media sites. I know personally that I see familiar faces on this blog commenting and interacting with posts. That’s a rare situation on Twitter, especially once you break the 100 Follower mark.

Blogs Are Future Proof

Social media sites are under increasing scrutiny, and the next new thing is always trying to usurp the current leaders. Blogs are a mature technology, like email, that can be moved to different hosting sites and create a body of work that is persistent and owned by its creator (usually). Plus, outside of occasional ads, blogs aren’t secretly harvesting your personal data just to use them. They are still a more “pure” form of internet communication. Sure, the author may want to sell you something, but they are more up front about it. And often, many bloggers post just for the sake of it with no ulterior motives.

These are just a few of the reasons I believe blogs are still relevant in 2019 and better than social media. If you’re an author or artist reading this and don’t have a blog or a personal website with the ability to make blog posts, I implore you to get one.

 

publishing, writing, writing tips

Elements of Style

Following up on last week’s post about “Self-Editing for Fiction Writers” I wanted to post up what I still consider the single most valuable craft book in my collection. Elements of Style by Strunk and White. The cheapest, most portable, and infinitely useful little book on “the rules of writing”. It’s also a centerpiece in my kit of writing essentials for under $20 I outlined in an earlier post.

If you don’t own this book (in print), fix that. It will make you better.

book review, writing

Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Just finished reading Self-Editing for Fiction Writers. This is a fantastic resource for any author who is struggling with editing their own work or looking for some new knowledge. Written by two professional editors who have been through many a slush pile, it contains excellent advice about the craft using examples that are clear and easy to follow.

The examples are the strongest asset, as they are in context of actual works, not just one-off sentences like many editing and grammar books use.

Highly suggested if you or someone you know is deep in revising that manuscript.