book review

Book Review: “Good As Gone” by Amy Gentry

Thirteen-year-old Julie Whitaker was kidnapped from her bedroom in the middle of the night, witnessed only by her younger sister. Her family was shattered, but managed to stick together, hoping against hope that Julie is still alive. And then one night: the doorbell rings. A young woman who appears to be Julie is finally, miraculously, home safe. The family is ecstatic—but Anna, Julie’s mother, has whispers of doubts.  She hates to face them. She cannot avoid them. When she is contacted by a former detective turned private eye, she begins a torturous search for the truth about the woman she desperately hopes is her daughter. 

51r-+GWWHmLGood As Gone showed up under “New and Notable” in my Kindle Prime Reading, and I downloaded it since I occasionally branch out into other genres to mix things up. I don’t normally read suspense thrillers, but I enjoyed this one all the way through, despite a few flaws.

The story is well written, and moves between the protagonist, Anna Whitaker, and a few other characters. This is broken up between chapters, so it doesn’t get confusing, although toward the end of the story there is a lot of jumping around and “perspective shifts” which I won’t go into more detail on since it borders on spoilers. Suffice to say, I had to re-read a few pages to make sure I knew what was going on.

Gentry’s writing is solid, and she crafts a dark, believable tale that should satisfy fans of the genre and anyone looking for a gritty suspense story. It’s a quick read with very little filler, and only lagged briefly in a few spots. It was also refreshing that this appears to be a standalone novel, since so many thrillers are huge series.

If you’re interested in Good As Gone you can buy it using the affiliate link below, which helps to support my blog.

Good as Gone: A Novel of Suspense

What I Liked:

  • Strong story pacing, excellent characterization
  • Interesting perspective shifts
  • Complete story arc. No cliffhangers

What I Didn’t Like:

  • Perspective shifts became confusing at some points late in the story
  • A key subplot dragged a bit midway through
  • This piece of the publisher blurb that I initially spared you from. “Propulsive and suspenseful, Good as Gone will appeal to fans of Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train, and keep readers guessing until the final pages.” Makes me speculate they pressured the author into that title due to its similarity

 

book review

Book Review: “Bird Box” by Josh Malerman

Stu_1_largeBird Box by Josh Malerman

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Bird Box is one of the best speculative/horror novels I’ve read in the past year.

It’s a tale of survival as a woman named Malorie and her two children travel blindly (literally) through the wilderness. I suppose this could be classified as “post apocalyptic” as it contains elements of that sub genre, but similar to “The Road” it is far more about human behavior and how people manage to cope with extreme situations than the cause of the actual events themselves. It was an interesting idea to take one of the major senses away from all of the characters in the story, and provided for some tense moments.

Malerman’s writing is direct. Short, punchy sentences keep the action moving as the story flips between present and flashbacks. This was a quick and entertaining read. Concise, well written, and frightening, not much more I could ask for when it comes to a horror book.

If you’d like to purchase a copy, you can grab it in paperback or on your Kindle using the affiliate link below.

 Bird Box: A Novel

book review

Pines (Wayward Pines, #1) Review

Pines (Wayward Pines, #1)Pines by Blake Crouch

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I had mixed feelings about this book, and like most other reviewers, I’ll try to explain my feelings without spoiling anything.

The majority of the book is decent. It starts with a compelling mystery that really hooked me. Roughly 40% of the story continues to expand on that, and it has a nice “Twin Peaks” vibe. Very ominous.

Unfortunately, that mystery eventually wears out its welcome and devolves into multiple extended chase scenes, along with some pointless flashbacks peppered in. This ultimately leads up to a reveal that is ultimately lackluster. Although I wasn’t as taken aback by the author’s style (intentional lack of pronouns, etc) as some were, what really stuck out to me was the weapon and vehicle details. The main character IS ex-military/secret service, but the explicit naming of some equipment and processes just felt odd and jarring to me.

Based on the reveal and ending, along with the teaser chapter at the end of the novel, I don’t plan to read any further into the series, which is a bummer because I thoroughly enjoyed the book when I started it.

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book review

“Bloodstone” Review

BloodstoneBloodstone by Karl Edward Wagner

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I count myself as a fan of “dark fantasy”, and Bloodstone was an excellent find in the genre. If you enjoy Conan and other grim worlds, the realm of Wagner’s anti-hero Kane should be right up your alley.

I ran across this book while scouring for older fantasy works, since I have been getting a bit bored with a lot of the modern fantasy I’ve been checking out as of late. Plus I have been playing Dark Souls, and it put me in the mood to read something set in a brutal realm. Kane is an interesting character, enigmatic and self-serving, but he’s the type of guy you love to hate. Wagner’s universe is oppressive and unforgiving; full of demons, vicious sword fights, and dark sorcery. His prose is DENSE, and the vocabulary he uses to build his vision demands full attention. I found myself re-reading pages to ensure I knew what was happening.

If I can level a few criticisms, the middle of the book lags a bit, but it’s not so horrible a slog that I became bored. Also, the authors penchant for “SAT words” (he was also a psychologist) ran a little rampant and he picked a select few to overuse. You can only read the word “coruscant” so many times before it becomes irritating. There was also some verbiage that I can only describe as medical terminology that arrived late in the story and felt a bit out of place.

Outside of those minor faults, it’s an excellent story that pulls no punches in creating an intense atmosphere that blends dark fantasy and science fiction. I’d highly recommend it to anyone who is looking for a challenging read that is at the opposite end of the spectrum from the “Tolkien-esque” heroic high fantasy.

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