What To Blog About If You’re Not Published

Some great tips from published Y.A. author K.M. Allan. These are specific to author/bloggers (a bit of a niche) but still extremely useful. Unpublished writers are urged to “build a platform”, but it can be hard to come up with content ideas when you lack the authority of previous publication. These are all great content topics she’s listed. I say that because many of them are the type of content I posted myself here on Suburban Syntax prior to becoming published myself. The system works!

K.M. Allan

While June might remind us were already halfway through another year, it is also this blog’s blogiversary month!

I published my first post in June 2017. That kicked off the 117 posts I’ve published since.

I launched my blog to extend my writer platform. I’d already begun querying agents and publishers and had been rejected, but was still two years away from signing the small press contract I was offered in January 2019. I wasn’t published anywhere and didn’t have a book out to plug.

So what does a writer who isn’t published write about?

Writing, of course! My first post was titled Just Start, which was, and still is, a life motto of mine.

While I’m still another 6 months away from being officially published (the first book in my YA series, Blackbirch, is coming early 2020), I’ll continue to practice what I preach and blog about…

View original post 1,103 more words

Advertisements

The Future of Barnes & Noble

image of people in a bookstore

Barnes & Noble Sold

I just heard that Barnes & Noble was sold to Elliot, a venture capital firm that also owns the U.K. bookseller Waterstones.

I have had a tenuous, love/hate kind of relationship with B&N, and have blogged about it in the past. I’m not a fan of the way Barnes & Noble annihilated numerous other book retailers and mom&pop shops through the late 1990’s and 2K’s (similar to Blockbuster Video), but it’s nice to have an option besides Amazon if my local indie book seller can’t get what I want. Plus, I’m still one of those weirdos who reads “enthusiast magazines” and B&N is literally the only brick and mortar retailer I know who stocks a variety of those.

Venture capital firm purchases are almost always dicey, but at least B&N will still exist.

What I’d like to see happen

  • Get some personality: The pitch is a more “decentralized” model where the individual stores have a bit more autonomy. I think this is a great idea, and knowing some actual real-life B&N employees, I think its for the best. I have three Barnes & Noble in my general vicinity, and the one that does best allows its workers to inject personality and unique style into the space. It makes the place feel a bit more like a large indie book store, and feels inviting.
  • Re-focus on books: Get rid of the toys, games, Funko Pop figurines, and all that other junk, and add a wider selection of things to read! I’m still all for book-related gifts like Moleskines, bookmarks, and reading lights. That’s fine. But if I want vinyl I’ll go to a record store. Give me a horror and expanded literature section.
  • Kill the Nook: Just do it. Please. Put the thing into the landfill with all those copies of “E.T.” for the Atari.
  • Engage local reading and and writing communities: More local author readings, more book clubs, more big names stopping in on their book tours. All of it. Give readers a reason to drop by.

Better Than Nothing

I’m still a proponent of local independent bookstores over Barnes & Noble (support your local indie!) but it’s better than having no stores at all. Amazon is just the coldest experience possible. No tactile feel, no page whoosh, no book smell.

I guess we’ll see what the future holds for Barnes & Noble, and I hope it’s a turn for the better.

Book Review: “Closer Than You Think” by Lee Maguire

41053893Dr. Bryce Davidson is a well-respected psychologist who is struggling through a divorce. When a new patient shows up in the hospital he is working at, things take a sinister turn as he begins to receive threatening messages and “gifts” from an unknown stalker.

Closer Than You Think (A Broken Minds Thriller) is the debut novel from author Lee Maguire.

Closer is a tense thriller that weaves an interesting narrative from start to finish. Since it is written in first-person POV, we’re along for the ride with Dr. Davidson as he tries to unravel the mystery of his threatening and enigmatic stalker. He’s a sensitive and likable guy, but not without faults. As tension rises, his paranoia and anxiety begin to take their toll. Even a nightly stroll with Max, his beloved basset hound, becomes an exercise in fear.

Maguire does a great job of keeping the reader guessing. As the story progressed, I was pulled into Dr. Davidson’s thoughts. While he checked potential suspects “off the list”, it became harder and harder to determine what was reality, or some sort of paranoid delusion. The added cast of characters including his co-workers and creepy apartment groundskeeper are well fleshed out, and make for a believable mystery for Bryce to weave his way through.

I also need to comment on the accurate use of psychology and healthcare terms. Maguire’s own experience in the field and research really shined through in the prose.

While Closer Than You Think leads to a satisfying conclusion (no spoilers!) I have to say there were a few parts where the story dragged a bit. I also caught a few more grammar and spelling errors than I would have liked, but nothing so egregious that I was pulled out of the story.

Overall I can recommend Closer Than You Think as a strong debut offering, to anyone who enjoys psychological thrillers or the cat-and-mouse tension of a tale involving stalkers.

What I Liked:

  • Likable and engaging protagonist.
  • Complex, but follow-able, plot
  • Good use of tension, paranoia

What I Didn’t Like:

  • Story dragged a bit in places
  • Book could have used another line-editing pass

 

Note: A review copy of Closer Than You Think was generously provided by TCK Publishing in exchange for an honest review. Check them out on Facebook and Twitter

 

Thoughts on Self-Publishing in 2019

animal-blur-chameleon-567540

I’ve written a few posts in the past on the “Traditional versus Self-Publishing” debate. As someone who has work released through both channels, it is something I periodically reflect on. Mostly on the self-publishing side, because it changes very rapidly in comparison to the iceberg-like pace of the traditional publishing industry.

This week I listened to a podcast interview with a small publisher, and he spoke about the self-publishing landscape as retracting. Not from the content standpoint, but from the perspective of readers becoming more selective in their purchases.

This coincides with something I’ve been feeling now for a while, which is that self-publishing, specifically through Amazon, is no longer a viable path for a majority of writers. It’s in no way a slam against indie authors. For the few who are making it work, that’s awesome, and certain segments of the industry (mainly Romance) are reaping the majority of their sales through it. But for the average “aspiring author” who is creating literary fiction or writing in a broad genre like “YA”, fantasy, or science fiction, traditional publishing seems to be the way to go in 2019.

Continue reading

Blogs Are Still Relevant in 2019

blog-content-marketing-icon-262508

While putting in extra time to market the re-release of Detroit 2020, I have been giving a lot of thought to blogging. In particular, blogs versus social media.

While I forcibly had to upgrade to a smartphone from last year’s beloved flip phone, I still refuse to put any social media apps on it, because of all the creativity-stifling reasons outlined here.

I’ve reduced my usage to Twitter alone, via a desktop app. I feel it’s a better way to interact with the service.

But enough about that…

If you’re a writer, or anyone with a serious artistic hobby, I want to convince you that having a blog is still totally relevant in 2019. You might think blogs are falling by the wayside, but I believe they are still a powerful tool for relationship building.

Blogs Are Your Space

Blogs are a place for you to compose complex thoughts, and more nuanced posts on broad topics. They are also a place that you can display or discuss your creative work to an audience. That body of work comes together and creates a much stronger online identity and portfolio of work than the limited profile spaces that social media sites give you. Most of those social profiles give you a spot to place your URL. You should have a blog to put in there. This is especially true if you pay for your own blog hosting and can customize things extensively.

Blogs Promote Long-Form Content

Readers want long form content. Videos, memes, and 280-character posts are generally glorified fluff commentary. To really understand something and have an informed conversation that is more than just noise, you need “long reads”. Blogs are still the best place online for that. No imposed limitations and the ability to use different forms of media to create complex posts. That old saying “content is king” still applies.

Blogs Are Easy

People say things like “I don’t get Twitter.” or “I don’t get Instagram.” Social media platforms all have different little quirks and systems that they use to stand out. Those quirks create a learning curve, and sometimes rules of etiquette. Blogs are so much easier. You just click, read, and then comment if you are inclined. There’s no hashtags or icons or flags to figure out why (and if) you should be pushing them.

Blogs Build Real Audiences

Blogs build relationships. They create “real readership” and and an engaged audience. Most social media entails “liking” a post, and maybe a quick comment or two. It’s essentially saying “Hey, we both enjoy this same thing. Cool.” and not much happens after that. Bloggers can guest post, link to one-another, and re-use or share content in a number of ways with other like-minded people. Plus, similar to email lists, readers/followers are generally much more committed than on social media sites. I know personally that I see familiar faces on this blog commenting and interacting with posts. That’s a rare situation on Twitter, especially once you break the 100 Follower mark.

Blogs Are Future Proof

Social media sites are under increasing scrutiny, and the next new thing is always trying to usurp the current leaders. Blogs are a mature technology, like email, that can be moved to different hosting sites and create a body of work that is persistent and owned by its creator (usually). Plus, outside of occasional ads, blogs aren’t secretly harvesting your personal data just to use them. They are still a more “pure” form of internet communication. Sure, the author may want to sell you something, but they are more up front about it. And often, many bloggers post just for the sake of it with no ulterior motives.

These are just a few of the reasons I believe blogs are still relevant in 2019 and better than social media. If you’re an author or artist reading this and don’t have a blog or a personal website with the ability to make blog posts, I implore you to get one.