How Many Lenses Should You Own?

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I recently purchased a Vivitar 50mm 1.8 prime lens (K-Mount) for my Pentax KM. This brings my total # of vintage lenses up to 7, across two camera bodies.

Since each of them is a prime lens (meaning fixed and cannot zoom), I wondered what other film photographers consider the “correct” number of lenses for their kit?

For my Ftb and KM I have a 28mm wide angle, 50mm, and 135mm macro. FD and K-mount, respectively. I also have a 55mm K-mount, but it is very similar to the 50mm. I feel like this gives me a decent range and capability for various projects.

I was lucky to inherit a number of the lenses, and find good deals on others, especially since film photography can get expensive and I’m trying to stick to a firm budget.

What are your preferred lenses? Do you like the sharpness of primes, or the flexibility of zoom lenses so you don’t have to lug around as much in your bag?

Film Photography is for Smart People who Don’t Like to Waste Time and Money — 6×6 Portraits | Kenneth Wajda

We have plenty of photographs. What we really need is a curator! I was talking to my oldest brother, who is in these four pictures below with my Grandpop and Grandmom. He was visiting my Dad’s house and going through some boxes and came upon these photographs that were in an album, and he texted […]

via Film Photography is for Smart People who Don’t Like to Waste Time and Money — 6×6 Portraits | Kenneth Wajda

More Reasons to Join A Writer’s Group

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Summer is right around the corner, and that’s going to mark the second anniverary of my writer’s group. We’ve had numerous up’s and down’s, membership turnover, and even a venue change, but the core group of authors who initially put it all together are still there, grinding away and putting out the work.

In honor of this, I want to re-visit my earlier ‘Reasons to Join A Writer’s Group’ post with a few more ideas now that our family has grown and matured (or at least gotten older).

Networking

The writer’s group I belong to is successful. That might sound a bit conceited, but it’s true. In the past two years, nearly every author in the group is traditionally published, gotten into a respected Workshop, worked with well-known editors on anthologies, or raised their platform through media tours. One of our members even got a multi-book deal.

Now, all of that is on their own hard work and diligence, but having a trusted group of friends and colleagues to advise and share contacts with is also so much more important than I ever would have known. Being able to “vouch” for another writer to an editor, agent, or artist can open doors you simply wouldn’t have come across flying solo. Plus, we learn from one another’s triumphs and failures, which better helps everyone in the group to navigate the complex landscape of writing and publishing.

Trusted Critiques

Writing is an extremely personal thing, and as one member of my group put it “it takes a lot of trust to hand your work over to someone”. This is true, and what has struck me even more, years on, is that critiques in our group have become simultaneously more comfortable and more intense. As you get to know one another, walls come down, and you can both give and receive the kind of fundamental, honest feedback that is needed to improve a book or story. Plus, when you receive that constructive criticism, you know it’s coming from a place of honest encouragement. We all have each other’s best interest in mind.

Accountability

Meeting with a group regularly, over the long-term, helps to keep you accountable to actually write. Knowing you need to submit, at least every once in a while, will keep you from getting too comfortable. You want to write, after all, and it helps to have friends with common goals who will really push you to get words on the page.

Are you a member of a local writer’s group in your area? If so, tell me about your experiences down in the comments.

New Release: STRANGE BLOOD

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Hey everyone,

Just a quick note that my essay on the 1988 Nicholas Cage flick “Vampire’s Kiss” is now available in the anthology STRANGE BLOOD edited by Vanessa Morgan.

If you’re a vampire movie fan, it’s a great collection of 71 deep cuts. There are some familiar “main stream” movies, but a lot of it is really weird, obscure, and vamp adjacent stuff. It’s a very cool collection featuring some great writers and movie critics, and I’m glad to be a part of it.

You can pick it up in paperback and eBook format here on Amazon.

Write Like Yourself

This post by Jordan Peters over on “The Art of Blogging” has some sound advice. While my style differs a bit from everything he proposes, that’s kind of the whole point! I agree with much of what he says that a bloggers voice should be more informal. I believe in this medium, its part of what creates a strong connection with an audience and fellow bloggers.

The Art of Blogging

Let’s face it: most people can’t write their way out of a paper bag. Further, most bloggers are boring, most journalists are so heavily edited that any personality they’ve added to a story has long since been weaned out by the editorial process.

I want to let you in on a secret, though: it’s not really that people are boring, but that too many have been taught that you shouldn’t write the same way you talk. I blame our educational system, actually, with those 5th grade teachers who drilled us on adverbs, pronouns and the minutia of grammar, coupled with too many boring, tedious academic books that we all suffered through while in college.

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