How To Quit Facebook (As A Writer)

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I get a lot of questions from fellow writers, and some readers, about Facebook. Mostly around my complete lack of having a Facebook account. Some are shocked to learn I got rid of it over 6 years ago (before the scandals) and my reason wasn’t personal privacy, but rather a loaf of bread. Yup. You read that right. Bread.

I’ve decided to be all artsy-fartsy about it and detail here the steps I took, why I took them, and what happened. All in short story format.

Notes:

  • The focus is on writers, but this guide could be for anyone looking to regain control of their time
  • If I sound preachy, I’m really not trying to be. If Facebook works for you and makes you successful, I’m glad it’s a useful tool for you
  • I’m so totally 100% aware you’re looking at that Instagram feed over there on the right side of this page (Facebook owns them) and going “OH THE IRONY!” The thing is, I play with Instagram once every couple of weeks, and I strictly curate it to focus on my love of art, books, and gory b-grade horror movies
  • I quit Facebook years ago, but I tried to make the story relevant to someone using it in 2018
  • This post is going to be long, and I’m writing it in the 2nd person, just to be asinine on a Monday.

 

Chapter 1 : Choosing to Quit Facebook (A Crack in The Mirror)

You decided to quit Facebook. Because you wanted more time to write. Maybe you sat down to write the next chapter in your novel, and ended up wasting forty five of the precious ninety minutes you had, looking at endless streams of encouraging GIF’s stating “Writer’s write!” Maybe you were in your local grocery store and saw a Facebook logo on a loaf of bread, and you said–

“Why has everyone accepted the dominance of this corporate force into their lives, to the point where food packaging is branded with a tiny F? Why do food companies want me to “connect” with them? Shouldn’t I spend my limited time on this mortal coil exercising my freedom of creative human expression, instead of connecting with Pop-Tarts on social media?”

Then you shouted, “I reject this, Mark. I reject all of this! I want more time to write!” And freaked out the elderly woman standing next to you in aisle nine.

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The 5 Stages of Rejection Letter Grief

Another post from over on K.M. Allan’s blog this week. This one is some kind of chicken soup for the mortally wounded writing soul. Can you relate to these 5 stages of grief when the rejection letters arrive in your inbox? Or mailbox if you’re submitting to the REALLY fancy places…

K.M. Allan

A few weeks ago I received a rejection letter from a publisher. This wasn’t the first rejection letter I’d received (far from it), nor was it different from any of the other rejection letters I’ve been sent or seen posted by other writers.

There was the usual, it’s not you, it’s me, and the non-committal we can’t tell you anything specific, which I’ve learned to skim and not take to heart, but this one got to me.

Maybe it was the fact I waited 1 year, 3 months and 23 days for it. Or maybe it was that the letter was such an impersonal form rejection that had no name at the bottom, even though I’d had two email conversations with the same specific editor at the publishing company during that 15-month wait. Or maybe it was that it had been a long time between rejections and I…

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Book Review: “C.H.U.D. Lives! (A Tribute Anthology)”

image of a CHUD

Let’s talk about C.H.U.D.

C.annibalistic H.umanoid U.nderground D.wellers to some, C.ontamination H.azard U.rban D.isposal to others (who are buying into the government cover up!)

C.H.U.D. Lives! is a scifi-horror anthology that Crystal Lake Publishing released back in April of this year that expands on the universe of the original 1980’s cult classic film C.H.U.D., but thankfully not on its sequel C.H.U.D. II: Bud The Chud which was horrifying for all the wrong reasons.

The stories range from yarns that build upon key scenes from the movie (whatever happened to that little girl and her grandpa in the phone booth?) to more speculative tales that take us into the future and other locales outside of New York City. The common thread is always C.H.U.D.’s. People that have been exposed to toxic ooze and transform into violent, flesh-eating mutants with glowing yellow eyes.

Like most anthologies, the quality of story varies. I’m happy to report that almost all entries are well written and strong. My favorites were “The City Will Eat You Alive” by Ryan C. Thomas, and “Lost and Found” by Greg Mitchell, with a special mention of “That’s Entertainment!” by Mort Castle due to its timely humor and social satire. Most of these focused on people dealing with C.H.U.D.’s in different horrifying scenarios that called back to the film. The stories that didn’t hit home for me were the more action-oriented offerings. While I’m sure some readers would love them, I’m not really into the whole “military procedural” style of action fiction. If someone uses a sub-machine gun, I don’t care what model it is or how it sounds, specifically.

cover of CHUD Lives anthology book

Crystal Lake Publishing has been knocking it out of the park with the horror anthologies lately. I have been a massive fan of C.H.U.D. since I first saw the movie over two decades ago. In that time, the Internet has shown it’s love as well, but there has been very little in the way of new content for fans. This book fills a much needed gap, and I can definitely recommend it to anyone who enjoyed the film.

If you’ve never seen C.H.U.D. and have even the slightest interest in horror movies, fix that! Grab some popcorn and treat yourself to one of the most beloved cult-schlock gems of the 1980’s. It’s gory, funny, and totally over-the-top. Plus it stars John Heard, and a young Daniel Stern.

Two horribly mutated, glowing, thumbs up!

WHAT I LIKED:

  • C.H.U.D.’s
  • World building that expanded upon key scenes from the film
  • Gross-out violence along with tongue-in-cheek humor

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE:

  • It was over a little too soon, could have used a few more stories
  • A few entries bordered on “gun p*rn” which I’m not a fan of
  • A couple stories contained ‘howlers’ that the editor should’ve caught before it went to press

No, You can’t have too many books.

This post hit close to home for me, since I have been trying to exercise restraint buying new books while I whittle down my “To Be Read” pile. I’m happy to think this ‘antilibrary’ concept is what gives me inspiration as I sit among the bookcases in my writing room…that or maybe it’s just all the bright colors? -BLD

Live to Write - Write to Live

cranky book cat Library cat says, “Don’t judge me.”

Over the course of his life, Umberto Eco amassed a collection of some thirty thousand books. The twentieth-century Italian novelist, philosopher, and medievalist housed his personal library in a labyrinthine expanse of long, bookcase-lined hallways that led to and through dozens of rooms, each of which was filled with rows of heavily laden shelves. Nestled here and there were large tables stacked high with more books and piles of manuscript pages. It was the kind of place you could easily—and if you were a bibliophile, happily—get lost in.

While my own library is immeasurably more modest than Signor Eco’s, the two do have something in common: both include a number of books never read by their owner.

I used to feel guilty about all the unread books on my shelves, but that was before I read about the “antilibrary.” The term was coined by

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10 Signs You’ve Upgraded To Being A Serious Writer

This is a great (and scarily accurate) list of goal posts for the evolving writer.

K.M. Allan

Of course, you’re a writer if you write. The act of putting words down on paper to create a story is the very definition of being a wordsmith, but what takes you from wannabe writer to writer, and then upgrades you to a serious writer?

Spoiler alert, actually writing is only a small part of it.

10 Signs You’ve Upgraded To Being A Serious Writer

1. You’re not afraid to show others what you’ve written.

2. Receiving rejections from agents and publishers no longer stings (as much).

3. Sending a query or submission doesn’t fill you with (complete) fear.

4. You’re happy to pass on the advice that you’ve learned to other writers.

5. You’re writing daily or regularly enough that actual pages are being added to your MS.

6. Ideas for stories come thick and fast. Your creative brain is always on.

7. You’ve started a social media account…

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