“Slay The Beast!” New Microfiction Published

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Hey everyone,

My new piece of microfiction,  “Slay The Beast!”, was published and you can read it here for free on 50-WordStories.com

I’d like to thank Tim from 50-Word Stories for picking it up, and I’d encourage all my readers to check out his site. It’s an awesome project, and if you write micro or flash fiction I’d also encourage you to submit something. It’s a fun craft challenge trying to articulate a story in EXACTLY fifty words.

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My Favorite Short Story

image of "nada" graphic novel comic

Short stories are my preferred medium.

Something about their brevity and clarity of message draws me to them. They are challenging to write and (often) to read. Short stories tend to allow authors to experiment far more than full length novels. An excellent short story can deliver the kind of gut-punch you just don’t get from a book, because of their focus and economy.

Every word matters.

That said, I wanted to post about my favorite short story; “Eight O’clock in The Morning” by Ray Faraday Nelson. Ray published this story in 1963. It was later re-published as a comic called “Nada” in 1986, and then provided inspiration for the 1988 John Carpenter masterpiece They Live.

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Getting Writer Friends – Wicks Writes

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I saw this post from Emily over on “Wicks Writes” and wanted to reblog it. I had previously posted about reasons to join a writer’s group and her post just reinforces that with some other great reasons to seek peer feedback on your work.

Check it out!

Hello Friends! I hope you are all having a lovely morning so far, Sundays mornings are meant for relaxation and (of course) writing. Sundays are best spent reading, writing and lounging while ignoring the ever present fact that work comes again tomorrow…forget I mentioned it! For now I will let you in on more of […]

via Get some writer friends! — Wicks Writes

Writing Tip: Know Your Audience

image of medieval wood carving

Who is this for?

That question is asked frequently during critiques in my writer’s group.

It’s an important question, and I feel writers should always let it hover in the back of their minds when creating a story.

There’s a saying that “the first draft is for the author, the second for the editor, and the final for the reader”. While I feel there is truth to that, in some ways, a writer should always have an audience in mind. Even if that audience is just themselves.

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