Writing in Your Books is Good Fun

image of Herzog book

image credit: LitReactor.com

If his soul could cast a reflection so brilliant, and so intensely sweet, he might beg God to make such use of him. But that would be too simple. But that would be too childish. The actual sphere is not clear like this, but turbulent, angry. A vast human action is going on. Death watches. So if you have some happiness, conceal it. And when your heart is full, keep your mouth shut also.

It’s Friday, and I’m ripping this incredibly controversial topic straight from the headlines.

It’s a dispute that can destroy relationships, families, and book clubs.

The question at hand?

IS IT OK TO WRITE IN YOUR BOOKS?????

My answer?

YES.

I actually like to look back over highlighted passages that spoke to me, as well as jot little notes in the margins of stories to capture my in-the-moment thoughts on them. I use the “highlight passage” feature on my Kindle regularly.

Plus, when I purchase a used paperback, I actually like finding highlights and notes from the previous owner. In a way it makes me feel like that particular copy is more special and has a bit more to tell than it’s mass-pressed brothers and sisters.

David Cranmer over on LitReactor agrees with me.

Change our minds.

Advertisements

The 5 Stages of Rejection Letter Grief

Another post from over on K.M. Allan’s blog this week. This one is some kind of chicken soup for the mortally wounded writing soul. Can you relate to these 5 stages of grief when the rejection letters arrive in your inbox? Or mailbox if you’re submitting to the REALLY fancy places…

K.M. Allan

A few weeks ago I received a rejection letter from a publisher. This wasn’t the first rejection letter I’d received (far from it), nor was it different from any of the other rejection letters I’ve been sent or seen posted by other writers.

There was the usual, it’s not you, it’s me, and the non-committal we can’t tell you anything specific, which I’ve learned to skim and not take to heart, but this one got to me.

Maybe it was the fact I waited 1 year, 3 months and 23 days for it. Or maybe it was that the letter was such an impersonal form rejection that had no name at the bottom, even though I’d had two email conversations with the same specific editor at the publishing company during that 15-month wait. Or maybe it was that it had been a long time between rejections and I…

View original post 746 more words

No, You can’t have too many books.

This post hit close to home for me, since I have been trying to exercise restraint buying new books while I whittle down my “To Be Read” pile. I’m happy to think this ‘antilibrary’ concept is what gives me inspiration as I sit among the bookcases in my writing room…that or maybe it’s just all the bright colors? -BLD

Live to Write - Write to Live

cranky book cat Library cat says, “Don’t judge me.”

Over the course of his life, Umberto Eco amassed a collection of some thirty thousand books. The twentieth-century Italian novelist, philosopher, and medievalist housed his personal library in a labyrinthine expanse of long, bookcase-lined hallways that led to and through dozens of rooms, each of which was filled with rows of heavily laden shelves. Nestled here and there were large tables stacked high with more books and piles of manuscript pages. It was the kind of place you could easily—and if you were a bibliophile, happily—get lost in.

While my own library is immeasurably more modest than Signor Eco’s, the two do have something in common: both include a number of books never read by their owner.

I used to feel guilty about all the unread books on my shelves, but that was before I read about the “antilibrary.” The term was coined by

View original post 638 more words

10 Signs You’ve Upgraded To Being A Serious Writer

This is a great (and scarily accurate) list of goal posts for the evolving writer.

K.M. Allan

Of course, you’re a writer if you write. The act of putting words down on paper to create a story is the very definition of being a wordsmith, but what takes you from wannabe writer to writer, and then upgrades you to a serious writer?

Spoiler alert, actually writing is only a small part of it.

10 Signs You’ve Upgraded To Being A Serious Writer

1. You’re not afraid to show others what you’ve written.

2. Receiving rejections from agents and publishers no longer stings (as much).

3. Sending a query or submission doesn’t fill you with (complete) fear.

4. You’re happy to pass on the advice that you’ve learned to other writers.

5. You’re writing daily or regularly enough that actual pages are being added to your MS.

6. Ideas for stories come thick and fast. Your creative brain is always on.

7. You’ve started a social media account…

View original post 279 more words