photography

Kodak Gold 200 Film Discontinued?

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I got a hot tip yesterday from the /r/analogcommunity on Reddit that Kodak Gold 200 film was on a serious discount at Walgreen’s pharmacies across the U.S.A.

Averaging between $4.79-$12 for a 3-pack of 24 exposure rolls, the clearance price varies from decent to “gotta grab it” levels of bargain basement insanity. I spent an hour yesterday afternoon driving to my area Walgreen’s and while some had already sold out, I managed to find five packs. Only one was expired.

Walgreen’s clearance has everyone speculating that Kodak could be discontinuing the Gold 200 line of film stock, perhaps leaving only ColorPlus 200 and Ultramax 400 for user-grade films?

I’ve never shot Gold 200 before. I’ve seen some nice work with it online, but honestly for a 200 ISO film it was simply too expensive compared to the ColorPlus 200 and Fujifilm C200 I was able to snag online. C200 seems to be getting rarer, and if Gold will truly be discontinued then I’m glad I’ll have a little stockpile in my fridge.

My hope is that Kodak is simply discontinuing 3-Packs of it. Inexpensive film is a good gateway to photographers who are either discovering or returning to film photography, and at least where I am it’s near impossible to find Kodak ColorPlus 200 anywhere but online. I hear it’s more of a European product? I’m sure there are business reasons behind it, but I hope they maintain at least one cheapo stock alongside the Portas and Ektars for higher-end use.

If you’re reading this and dig on Gold, go check out your local Walgreens. Kodak Gold 200 apparently produces very rich reds and yellows, so I’m anticipating some nice Autumn foliage shots when I load it up.

guest post, re-blog

My interview with photographer and author Johnny Joo

A great interview from “Rust Belt Girl”. Film photography, writing, and spooky stuff all rolled into one artist’s work? Count me in!

Rust Belt Girl

I’m so thrilled to present this interview with Johnny Joo, a fellow Northeast Ohio native, whose photography* I’ve featured at the blog before. But this time, we get the stories behind the lens…

Johnny Joo is an internationally accredited artist, most notably recognized for his photography of abandoned architecture and surrealistic digital compositions. Growing up sandwiched between the urban cityscape of Cleveland and boundless fields of rural Northeast Ohio provided Johnny with a front row ticket to a specialized cycle of abandonment, destruction, and nature’s reclamation of countless structures. Since he started, his art has expanded, including the publication of four books, music, spoken word poetry, art installations, and videography.

Johnny, how did you first get into photography–and abandonment photography in particular?

I was an art student in high school, and photography was another art class I could take, so I took it to fill space with as much…

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photography

Summer Fun on Cape Cod 2019

Here’s a selection of photos from my summer vacation back in August.

These were taken in Cape Cod, Massachusetts in Hyannis and on Mayflower Beach.

I used my Pentax KM along with some FujiFilm C200 and a “new” el-cheapo Vivitar 50:1.8 lens.

As a bonus, you also get “lamp in sky” which is my very first accidental double exposure using film. I had to fix my shutter and this happy accident (as Bob Ross would say) occurred. I think it looks pretty cool, and it’s the kind of thing that can only happy organically on film. I’m also keen on the odd chemical aberration that happened from the pic riding across the Bourne bridge.

Also of note: when your subject is seagulls, Wheat Thins are an effective form of payment to encourage them on the shoot.

writing, writing tips

Overcoming Self-Doubt & Imposter Syndrome

What I know (2)

I have struggled with serious writer’s block this year.

I’m not unique. I get that. At some point, it happens to nearly everyone who makes creative writing a serious undertaking.

This time felt different though. More severe, and a bit insidious.

I’ve written before about my struggles with my fantasy novel. I’m neck-deep in a 2nd draft/nearly full re-write, and the story will come out the other side looking nearly nothing like the 1st draft. Again, this is a relatively normal process, and lots of authors deal with that grind.

Somewhere along the way though, self-doubt started to creep in. Like a tiny seed sprouting and taking root in the deepest recesses of my brain, it grew under the right conditions (busy schedule, life changes, competing priorities) until it had flowered into what the French refer to as “Le Syndrome de Imposter” (not an actual translation) or, “Imposter Syndrome”. Honestly, no amount of writing podcasts or blogs can prepare you for that crippling self-doubt when it actually arrives. At least I was totally unprepared…

What the Internet didn’t tell me is that self-doubt doesn’t have to manifest as some sort of easily categorized fear. It’s not like you’ll panic, slam your laptop shut , and go curl up in the bathroom, when you see threads on Twitter asking to update on your current project. In fact, the cacophony of social media is a very comfortable place to hide, procrastinate, and “water the flower” so to speak. More on that later though.

My self-doubt manifested as apathy more than anything. Even with encouragement and responsibility to my writer’s group, every scene and chapter was a massive slog. I spent the better part of 2019 doing everything I could to avoid writing and I didn’t know why. It finally took some serious self-reflection and understanding of what the root of my insecurities were to address it and get back to really dissecting and writing my book.

I want to provide some advice in this post, rather than just anecdotally bemoaning my position, so here are some things that worked for me to start regularly putting words on the page again.

Continue reading “Overcoming Self-Doubt & Imposter Syndrome”